Category Archives: Developing & Planting

A range of anything from an idea, creating, developing, and changing, to planting

Hiring frogs, fish and herons!

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Rain, rain, and more rain, followed by a little snow, then more rain, has kept the flood zone fluctuating, but definitely always a swamp. I keep waiting for some frogs to take up residence in our yard.  The swamp area is a little too shallow to be a fish pond, but it seems like it has potential!  It wouldn’t surprise me to see a great blue heron standing there one morning, but not likely.

As our latent winter, pseudo-spring has raised our temperatures into the milder zones, the ground is ultra soggy, and every shovel of soil weighs close to 3 bricks.  It is not a time for planting anything in our yard yet; instead it has been a time of digging up old, neglected, and sprawling shrubs; weeding, and pruning plants to enourage their new looks.  A time to clear the old and make space for new.

Cycles of equilibrium: the balancing of energetic elements; over-abundant rain to counter balance 2-3 years of uncanny drought.

While April plays its games of freaky weather, we wait and dream for gentler, warmer days in May, to dry us out a bit, and give us momentum to actually plant.

Kitties are taking more outings, too, weather permitting.  Juni definitely has spring fever, and likes to take her time scouting around the neighborhood, sometimes causing her mom some anxiety.  Aspen is reliable in hanging around the premises, preferring to keep an eye on his human’s activities.

Spring has sprung in our part of the world! Time to admire the exquisite colors emerging all around us!

A New Year…A New Home…

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Happy New Year! Quite a bit of snow fell during December.

Sending everyone New Year greetings, whether Gregorian or Asian!  It’s been a wild few months of fall 2016, having gone through the process of sorting, packing, and moving my belongings from my beloved home of 18 years; also, the source of all my previous postings for High Vibe Bounty.  It was a prolonged process I wouldn’t care to repeat very soon.  Hard to believe the planning started in June, but not a lot could be done without any storage units available in this college town, until classes started in late September.  I could only pack so many boxes, before being stuck with no place to put them.

That led to a bit of stall in being able to show my place for rental purposes, but it all came together relatively easily; it just seemed to be a never-ending process to get through the needed repairs and improvements.  Naturally, I said my good-byes to the yard, and harvested the CG bounty for the last time.  I think neighbors were feeling little incentive to harvest, knowing I would be leaving, but I did put out a request for help in weeding and removing the last of the tomatoes!  Deer netting is still up for protect any weeds that are enjoying our winter…lol.  What my renter decides to do with that space is her choice!

Meanwhile, I have a new home and new roommate, who won over my heart (and apparently vice-versa).  I may have mentioned earlier that his yard is a more challenging scenario, given some years of neglect (not his priority or forte), but I have been rehabilitatinging his old blueberry bushes for 3 years, and they are doing great.  This year will require more thought on how much old wood to actually leave, now that many younger stems have filled in my previous thinnings. It might mean a temporary decrease in fruit this year, but we’re still stuffed to the freezer limits with last year’s stash!

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Blueberries biding their time through rain and snow! That irksome jack-in-pulpit ground cover thought our warm fall was just prime for re-emergence before winter, and wasn’t phased by any snow!

Unlike my own property project, which was essentially a clean slate of lawn that could be covered over and established as I liked, my new yard is overwhelmed with ancient shrubs, overgrown with English Ivy from neighbors’ yards, and a plethora of weeds/lawn.  There is a nice patch of area for putting in a veggie garden, yet it does not produce as prolifically as mine did, given clayier soil, more shade from gigantic trees on south and west property lines, a the house itself on its sunny eastern side.  Last summer we removed two giant sweetgum trees that had become a nuisance to the house foundation, so there is more eastern light in the morning, which is great inside the house, and for the newly planted landscape mounds in front of the house.

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Giant sweetgum no more, making way for more sun, and a new perennials bed project out of the ground stumps/earth, thereby letting me move a few favorites from my yard. Deer proof/resistant necessary on the open street size.

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Randall showing his new expertise, gardening and computer-tasking, both at the same time…not! Pleased with a new front yard that should be relatively drought tolerant in a couple of years.

The concept of “sharing the bounty as a community garden” is now not the priority topic at my new home, since we have no community garden out front here; it’s all in the large BACK yard.  Still, this will be a project of continuing the high vibes of gardening with both food and flowers.

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It’s a big area to redevelop, especially when the left side floods!

 

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Kwan Yin keeping an eye on things from her temporary abode. Like all those planters? Uprooted, and moved from various places, mostly my old yard. But, where to put them?

One of the dilemmas of how to salvage this backyard space is how much time, effort, and money, we want to actually invest in this, since we need professional help to remove and restore things.  We attempted to control the invasive ivy and jack-in-the-pulpit ourselves last summer,using mechanical and chemical means (in order to stay sane), but it hasn’t apparently had much effect, at least on the “pulpit” invaders.  And they love root disturbance, just as do blackberries (a few of those as well).  I can compromise with patches of weeds in proper places, but I have little tolerance for them around edible plants, so there’s a considerable amount eradication needed.  And, with neighboring rentals that aren’t really interested in maintaining weeds, there is always a source for re-invasion, hence continual vigilance and maintenance (though that in itself is nothing new for any garden).  And, in the long run, how long will we stay here?  The neighborhood, so close to campus, is prone to noisy parties and more problems that don’t delight my sense of security.  We already had a nice teak removed from the front porch while on vacation in December, even with someone coming to the house twice daily to feed Juni and Aspen.  Still, we will expand the veggie planting area, and hope for more successful tomatoes and squash this year.

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Aarg! Jack-pulpit, blackberries, ivy, and holly bushes make this garden maintenance a challenge in the long run.

I do love that the backyard is essentially deer-proof!  There are a few that have been spotted on occasion, but they tend to stay in neighborhoods 5 blocks away, where they have more front yard options to browse.  I have found one in a nearby yard, but he couldn’t get into ours.  And with so many large old trees surrounding us, there is a consistently larger diversity of birds: flickers, woodpeckers, chickadees, juncos, red finches, goldfinches, bushtits, nuthatches, western tanagers, scrub jays, and the obligatory always-quarreling starlings and crows, who raucously knock the suet feeders off the hooks.  A grey squirrel comes many days to pick up discards under the sunflower seed feeder.  It is quite the menagerie to watch on a given day, viewed from the kitchen window.  Our hummingbird feeder just under the front porch eave is visited by a female and a couple of males, with no more than 20 minutes’ absence between them on their rotations.  Life is good!

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Keeping Anna’s hummers fed and zippy!

Solstice Transitions

June is still maneuvering its way through mercurial weather, with increasing hints of true summer, now that we’ve crossed the official June Solstice date.  A far cry from last year, when temperatures were hot, long before summer, we have continual cycles of cool and warm, a few thunderstorms.  Although we’ve had weather more reminiscent of the ’80s – 90’s, strong gusty breezes seem to be present more than usual, so plants and soil dry out more quickly than anticipated.

It has been a bit rough getting our row of lettuce to proliferate until this last week; a weekend of extreme heat after 7 days of rain seemed to confuse it.  Then our local young bambi-deer came through to chomp down on the new seedlings that had been acquired to supplement the laggards.  Finally, they’ve sturdied themselves.  Meanwhile the mesclun mix and radishes have finished their acts, stretching themselves up in their time-to-bolt looks.  Since we got too busy to properly thin the radishes and greens early on, there was a bumper crop, with plenty to give away!

Changes are afoot for this bountiful garden and homesite, as life evolves, and it appears that I will be moving away to another residence, still local.  The heart calls to co-habitate with my significant other! His place is a bit larger than mine, but it will be a tight squeeze.  He has a very large back yard that has been minimally attended to until my presence in his life 😉   But, we won’t be attempting to rehabilitate or redesign it too much at this point; this may be a transition move, as we look for a different house that will be a bit larger.  The blueberry devas have definitely been busy improving the bounty over the last couple of years of my working with them.  Large, luscious berries this year!

Hence, this year our CG is smaller, maybe 55% of its usual size, with part of it tarped over for weed control.  Once some squash and melons are established, they can meander over the top of it.  Our usual participants are also either leading busier lives, or less inclined to participate for various reasons, so it is an appropriate time to scale down, and let part of the garden soil rest.  This has been another concept I’ve known needed to be implemented at some point, and this is the perfect opportunity!  Ideally, the planted portion this year could be left to rest next year, and the fallowed side this year can be planted.

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A misty day progressing, although Solstice was pleasantly sunny. Still in spring/summer transition, the familiar tomato red jackets, and jug covers for emerging melons and squash are present and keeping the youngsters warm and protected.

Then, to find a renter for my place, who loves to garden!

No deer here!

This is what we like…”invisible” fencing that deer really don’t like because it is so hard for them to see.

The "super-guys" modestly not showing off their muscles after post-digging.   Nice netting...can hardly see it!

The “super-guys” modestly not showing off their muscles after post-digging. Nice netting…can hardly see it!

Finally protected, just in time to remove all covers and jackets on the CG inhabitants.  With gratitude to the generosity of best friends with muscle power, the fencing got put up in a couple of hours, and looks great.  It is so much easier being able to walk inside freely instead of pulling back netting.

Yep, still level-headed after pounding posts!

Yep, still level-headed after pounding posts!

But these 4-leggeds are persistent in browsing, and decided if they can’t have lettuce or beans, then they’ll nibble some dogwood tips a few feet away.  They still manage to wind their way in from the neighbor’s garden when our barriers are not perfectly intact, and continue to harass my roses. and apples in the house yard.  Perhaps I will still see some small rosebuds this fall.

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Still no roses this year. The browsers escape into the garden through neighbor’s hedge on occasion.

Young lavender are playing sentinels for the recent melon sprouts in the pots.

Lavender seedling sentinels for the sprouting melons.  Keep those deer browsers out!

Lavender seedling sentinels for the sprouting melons. Keep those deer browsers out!

Rainy day musings

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While our drought relief continues with some fairly intense rain, this is a perfect time for reflection on what little wonders go on in the garden(s), apart from the major works.  The weeds can wait.  They aren’t going to disappear…

Amidst our fascinating weather, which is occurring worldwide, there has been ample opportunity to tune-in even more closely with the Nature spirits, the devas, the Elementals themselves.  They are my guides for anything going on anywhere in any part of the gardens.  I may be “director” for the CG, but they are my directors and prompters.

While experience and/or formal training can certainly play a valid part in planning and maintaining a garden, for me it is balanced by other promptings and knowings (call it intuition).  Though science and research has educated me in valuable ways about soil and attempting to manage plant diseases in various ways, nothing replaces the listening for advice from other levels of existence that science cannot prove…yet.  This places me in a position of constant learning, and wondering, and respect.

Sure, my back may not appreciate bending, weeding, shoveling like it used to allow…and I always overdo it, but the joy of feeling the other “Invisibles” around always makes it worthwhile.  Science doesn’t teach us that there are energetic caretakers for every plant that we see.  Science only sees the physical structure of a plant, but cannot locate or prove what provides the life force for the plant form, so therefore…it does not exist.  (Hopefully, this will change in the near future.) But, too many of us know this is not the case; too many of us know that life energy exists in myriad forms not yet visible to the eye.  Yet, we sense it, even if we don’t see or hear it.

When asked how I plan a garden, I reply that it is partly by thought and partly by feel.  I know what sort of typical “facts” exist about different plants, taking them into consideration, and then I feel for supportive promptings to guide me as to where to plant and when to plant.  It is like a tapestry, into which is woven the knowledge about what a plant might prefer for sunlight, soil, its size, habit, etc., along with the promptings for choice of color, and when to plant it. Sometimes it all happens at the same time, and sometimes there is a week or two of contemplation, until either weather dictates some action, or something prompts me to “do it now”!  Occasionally I get caught up in time restraints, and in the long run I didn’t listen carefully enough, and a plant might not overwinter as hoped, or not be in the right spot.  But, that becomes part of the magic of gardening…listening, learning, observing, and feeling it!  Really, everything comes down to BALANCE.  And gardening is a perfect way to balance the mind and the heart!

Some gardeners strictly adhere to planting by the moon phases, using particular dates as guidelines for seeding and transplanting above- and below-ground crops.  While I have used and appreciated the expertise of these guidelines, I have found it can be too regimented and a bit unrealistic for one’s available time to work in the garden.  In the spirit of balance, I often check a planting calendar for suggested dates, but am not restricted by it. In our area weather holds more sway in the feasibility for seeding.

We are entering a new cycle of earth and Life, that inspires and requires a huge SHIFT in how we think, feel, and relate to everything in our world.  Every thing and every one is connected!  New ways to power energy (for free or at least inexpensively), have been around for years, but not permitted to be publicly known.  This will change.  Ways to clean up the environment will be quite different than any current technologies.  The solutions to problems that have been created in the world will not come from the 3rd dimensional minds of this world, they will come from seemingly unknown sources, through the human mind…and heart.  Einstein was the first to say this because he knew and recognized during his own research.

Solar activity is high, the new light frequencies coming in are affecting everyone in myriad ways; there is a lot of instability and chaos, as that is a way of that old “stuff” gets shifted.  Weather is not just a scientific “phenomenon” either, it is alive!  It is more affected by solar and galactic activity, than just the oceans, and the patterns of cloud formations, etc.  As much as some of us would like to feel some normalcy with respect to tending our gardens, the fact is that there are no normal patterns anymore, and weather shifts almost day to day.  We must learn to adapt to the rapid changes and hope we can respond to the plants’ needs as well as we can.  And, I always ask the Invisible caretakers and Guardians to help, too.  They appreciate the requests to be of service and to co-create with us!

Groovin’ those rows…we are in session…

“The hand” is much better, while requiring continued respect and modified use, which is easily overlooked in the zeal of gardening.  The same applied to our weather, at times greatly “improved,” then commanding our cooperation.

Synchronized planting pose…

Mapping out the new coordinates…making labels…director’s privileges

With a spurt of record-setting heat in early May, followed by more rain, the greens department, along with radishes and beets, are looking outstanding!

Greens galore…chard is trying to show off its senior status.            Where’s Juni?  Where’s Aspen?

 

Squash, melon, and cucumber seeds were planted a week ago, but have not yet emerged, as our weather has cooled.  The first sowing of green beans is just saying hello.  Tomatoes and basil continue to be secluded in the coldframe.

The house yard is coming alive now with various perennials, while transplanted annuals are “sitting” and waiting for some more warmth.  Sages and butterfly weed are always the last to indicate their reboot, and most wintered perfectly, and are now sprouting new growth.

Success in overwintering the artichoke plant!

An added bonus is the blessing of nesting chickadees in a driftwood birdhouse purchased last summer.  I was content to have it simply as garden art, but it is actually being use!  Entry is near the top of the log, with a tiny overhang on it.  They zoom in and out of it with no problem; not sure how the chicks will maneuver it without a perch.  Obviously, I will be watching!

Chickadees in residence…do not disturb!

Off to a fabulous spring start!

Happy 1st birthday CG!

Why is it that the best weather of a 3-day weekend arrives after 4:30 pm on the final day?  Nevertheless it was an excellent weekend to move ahead with garden tasks, dodging drizzles and rain.  Although we don’t have the exceptionally fine weather that blessed our initial project one year ago, we celebrated by seeding the first phase of summer veggies.  As various CG members filtered into town from their various journeys, different tasks were done, depending on who showed up and when.

With the air and soil temperatures being nearly equal at 70°F we seeded various squash, melon, and cucumber cultivars, corn, and basil.  (Check out our 2010 planting list here.) One minute it was threatening rain, the next a few light rays of sun peaking through the clouds to make one want to don shorts; but wait 5 minutes, and the sun is gone.  Do I need another shirt again? Yes.  Wait, now I’m too warm.  It came down to rolling up the jeans and a t-shirt.

Taking a stroll through the house yard to check on tomato seedlings keeping warm in their little greenhouse, my mouth dropped as I spied a group of deer pellets on some grass.  Never in my residency here has one come this far into the yard!  We decided to grab netting and place it over the cool weather crops immediately.  He hadn’t managed to sample anything yet.  (I think it’s the same young male who visited solo last year.)  While tying out cloth strips soaked in Irish Spring soap solution on various young fruit trees and roses, I did notice some rose tips “nipped in the bud”.

Here is an update to the final harvest tally of our 2009 plantings, contributed to by our overwintering kale and leeks, which were removed in May for more garden prep:

  • Kale: 10 (pounds)
  • Leeks: 3.25

Bringing our 2009 grand total to……592 pounds!

As we celebrate our first birthday we have a new 2010 tally, from harvesting the thinnings of early spring plantings during April and May:

  • Beet greens: 1.5 pounds
  • Kale: 2.5
  • Lettuce blends: 7.5
  • Spinach: 2

Total: 12.75 pounds            Off to a great start!